PhD in Information Technology

Offered by the Department of Management Science and Information Systems, this program is closely associated with the Center for Information Management, Integration and Connectivity.

Students who aspire to doctoral study in information technology but need to strengthen their background may wish to consider our Master in Information Technology program, which admits both part-time and full-time students. Students in this program take many of the same courses as students in the doctoral program and may use these courses towards their doctoral degree if they are later admitted to the doctoral program.

In addition to possible teaching assistantships, research assistantships funded by faculty grants may be available for students with specific research interests. Faculty members who sometimes have grants that may permit the employment of doctoral students as research assistants include Professors Nabil Adam, Vijay Alturi, Glenn Shafer, Jaideep Vaidya, and Hui Xiong. Interested students should consult the web sites for these professors to learn more about their research interests.

Characteristics of students most likely to be admitted: Students are expected to have basic knowledge in calculus, probability, statistics, linear algebra, and computer science. Most students admitted in recent years come with a master’s degree in computer science, information technology, or industrial engineering.

 

Requirements

Seminar Series

Doctoral students in Information Technology who have not yet defended a dissertation proposal are expected to attend the seminar series of the Center for Information Management, Integration and Connectivity, and each semester they receive a grade on their transcript based on their attendance and participation. Applicants and potential applicants are also welcome at the seminar.

 

Course work, the qualifying examination, and the dissertation

A total of 72 credits is required for the doctoral degree. These must include:

  • at least 18 credits in dissertation research.
  • at least 36 credits in degree courses. (This can be reduced only if some course requirements are waived.)
  • 6 credits in the early research requirements.

 

Additional enrollments may also be required:

  • Students are sometimes required to enroll in non-degree courses to improve their English or their writing. They may also need to enroll in the non-degree course Teacher Training Seminar as part of their preparation for teaching.  These enrollments require payment of tuition, but they do not count towards the 72 credits required for the degree.
  • Students must enroll in 26:198:689 every semester until they have defended a dissertation proposal. This registration requires their attendance in CIMIC's weekly CIMIC Research Forum. A grade is given, but the enrollment is for zero credits and no tuition is charged.

 

During the first two years, students are expected to take at least three courses for degree credit each semester. They should then take the qualifying examination in May at the end of their second academic year. The last two years of the program should be devoted primarily to completing the dissertation, but students may be advised to take some additional courses. For more details concerning rules and requirements that apply to all RBS doctoral students, see Policies and Procedures.

 

Foundation/methodology requirement (4 courses)

These courses should be selected, in consultation with the adviser, from master’s level courses in information technology or computer science (taught at NJIT or at Rutgers-New Brunswick). In some cases, courses already taken by the student in the course of his or her master’s study may be transferred for credit to meet part of this requirement. However, students who have not yet studied Probability at the level of 26:960:575 should take it as one of their four minor courses.

 

Major (5 courses)

  • 26:198:621 Electronic Commerce (taught at the AIS department)
  • 26:198:622 Machine Learning (taught in the AIS department)
  • 26:198:641 Advanced Database Systems (taught in the MSIS department)
  • 26:198:643 Information Systems Security (taught in the MSIS department)
  • Additional course approved by adviser, departmental coordinator, and doctoral director.

 

Minor (3 courses)

  • 26:960:577 Statistical Linear Models and two other courses.

 

It is strongly recommended that students include the following courses in their study plan:

  • 26:198:644 Data Mining
  • 26:198:645 Privacy, Security, and Data Analysis

 

Teaching requirement: Each student must teach at least one information technology course at RBS. Before doing so, the student is expected to enroll in 26:620:701 Teacher Training Seminar, which is taught in the spring semester each year. Students who enter the program with financial support may need to take this course in their first year in order to be sure of having an employment opportunity from RBS during the Summer.

 

First early research requirement (equivalent to one course): Students write a paper with a faculty member, to be presented to the department during the fall semester.

 

Second early research requirement (equivalent to one course): Write a paper (ideally a dissertation proposal) with a faculty member, to be presented to the department during the fall semester.

 

Writing proficiency requirement: In late May or early June at the end of the first year, students participate in the program-wide Intensive Writing Seminar.

 

Other rules and requirements: For details of rules and requirements that apply to all doctoral students in RBS, see Policies and Procedures.

 

Scheduling of courses

Since students are admitted to the program every year, each course usually has both first and second year students, as well as students in the Masters of Information Technology program.