Media Coverage

Rochester, NY
Tuesday, May 8, 2012

A Rutgers University business professor who is the founding director of an entrepreneurship center has been named head of Rochester Institute of Technology’s business school.

Faculty


Reuters
Monday, May 7, 2012

Rutgers' Valentin Dimitrov says Facebook's dual-class structure could help keep entrepreneurial CEO Mark Zuckerberg in control, ultimately delivering greater returns for the company and shareholders.



NJ.com
Tuesday, May 1, 2012

In an informal survey conducted by the Institute for Ethical Leadership at Rutgers Business School, we found many universities employ a compliance officer, but rarely, a chief ethics officer. Staff and students are taught to comply with rules and laws regarding sexual harassment, conflict of interest and plagiarism. But most universities don’t have training programs to help them recognize and evaluate ethical dilemmas.

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Wednesday, April 25, 2012

If one has the time, energy and plan, jump-starting a business can bea cinch. But that's not necessarily the case if the chance at entrepreneurship falls beyond the reach of a deserving African-American student who welcomes the challenge, but lacks resources and guidance.

That scenario and others were addressed during a recent summit sponsored by the Small Business Association (SBA) and U. S. Department of Education in collaboration with the White House.

When asked what she tells young people bent on becoming their own bosses, panelist dt ogilvie of Rutgers University, responded that entrepreneurship is one of the most important subjects that can be taught. She noted a campus project which encourages youth to think about owning businesses.

"We're doing something called 'Lemonade Day' in Newark for the first time," ogilvie said. "Kids from kindergarten to age 12 learn how to be entrepreneurs in the context of developing a lemonade stand. [They learn] all the attributes of business" by putting a stand together to acquiring money for supplies, marketing and hiring.

"And that's important, because our young people need to be aware of entrepreneurship as an alternative career," said ogilvie. "We believe that entrepreneurship is the key."



BusinessWeek
Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Jill Zarin, former Real Housewives of New York Citystar, gives marketing advice to MBA students at Rutgers Business School (@RutgersBSchool, 4/19).



Bloomberg
New York, NY
Monday, April 9, 2012

Avon Products Inc. AVP has named Johnson & Johnson JNJ executive Sherilyn S. McCoy as its new chief executive, effective April 23. Ms. McCoy, 53 years old, has spent 30 years at Johnson & Johnson, most recently serving as a vice chairman on the company's executive committee.“Shari is a tremendous executive: forthright, pragmatic, knowledgeable, decisive,” Deborah Dunsire, CEO of Takeda Pharmaceutical Co.’s Millennium Pharmaceuticals unit, said in a February telephone interview after McCoy was passed over for J&J’s top spot. Ms. McCoy will also join Avon's board. Her resignation from Johnson & Johnson is effective April 18. She has a B.S. degree in textile chemistry from the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, a master's degree in chemical engineering from Princeton University, and an MBA from Rutgers University.



CEO Update
Friday, April 6, 2012

When it comes to association CEO salaries, the old aphorism holds true - the rich do get richer, and at a more rapid clip than the not-quite-as-rich, according to the latest CEO Update Inside Compensation analysis.

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New York Times
Newark, NJ
Friday, April 6, 2012

Professor Mark Castelino Writes to Editor a response to "How to Avert a Financial Overdose" (Fair Game, April 1). "The idea is intriguing. The standard argument made by Wall Street and many of my academic colleagues is that these instruments are useful for risk management and hedging. What is troubling, however, is whether some of these innovations manufacture risks where none existed before, amplify them and then create the need to hedge those risks. Credit default swaps are a prime example." 

Read full letter



Daily Targum
Friday, April 6, 2012

All of Julie Culley’s running will come down to one day, June 28, when she finds out if she has made the top three in the final tryout round for the U.S. Olympic team in the 5,000-meter race. Culley, a Rutgers Business School alumna, is now one second away from the Olympic qualifying standard of 15 minutes and 20 seconds to complete the 5,000-meter race. She will train and race hard over the next few months to hit that standard.



San Jose, California
Friday, April 6, 2012

A survey conducted last year in a Midwest school district found that 53 percent of high school students admitted to cheating on tests, 62 percent turned in work done by others and 72 percent admitted working with classmates on homework when collaboration was not permitted. Such numbers have remained high over time, said Don McCabe, the Rutgers Business School professor who conducted the survey of 4,800 students. A nationwide survey in 2010 indicated that two-thirds of high school students admit to cheating in some form.



Morningstar
Chicago, IL
Tuesday, April 3, 2012

 The Options Industry Council (OIC) announced today that the next event in its university outreach program, The Road to Wall Street: Analyze Your Options, will be at Rutgers Business School in Newark, NJ on Friday, April 13.



Friday, March 30, 2012

The International Warehouse Logistics Association recently presented its 2012 Distinguished Service Award to Dale S. Rogers, professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and co-director of the Center for Supply Chain Management at Rutgers University.



Fast Company
Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Professor Robert Schindler, a marketing professor at Rutgers Business School, conducted a study of a women’s clothing retailer. He found that the 1 cent difference between prices ending in .99 and .00 had “a considerable effect on sales," with items whose prices ended with .99 far outselling those ending with .00.



NJ.com
Monday, March 26, 2012

Knowing that diehards will see the movie out of loyalty to the book series helped Lionsgate keep its marketing budget at $45 million. John Longo, who teaches stock valuation and market psychology at Rutgers Business School, said the hype has made an impression on Wall Street, too. Lionsgate Entertainment Group’s stock price soared to a 52-week high as the studio shows signs of reaping big rewards with its newest franchise. Yesterday the stock closed trading for $14.55, up nearly 90 percent this year.



Business Wire
New Brunswick, NJ
Thursday, March 8, 2012

The Rutgers Center for Management Development (CMD) today announced that it has updated the format of the program to utilize the best Apple iPad 2 collaboration apps into the curriculum of the Strategic Marketing Management course in its Mini-MBA Program. All the modules and applications for the week-long course, which begins March 26, 2012, on the New Brunswick, New Jersey, campus will be pre-loaded onto an Apple iPad 2, which is included in the course fee.



Digital Journal
Washington, D.C.
Tuesday, March 6, 2012

CTIA-The Wireless Association® announced today John Marinho will be its Vice President of Technology and Cybersecurity effective March 12. In the newly created role, among Marinho's key responsibilities will be leading CTIA's efforts to help the wireless industry secure its networks and devices against cybersecurity threats and educating policymakers on emerging technologies while advocating for sensible and practical regulations that do not impose unintended consequences. He will also serve as CTIA's primary liaison with government agencies on cybersecurity issues. Marinho has an MBA from Rutgers Graduate School of Management and graduated cum laude from New Jersey Institute of Technology in electrical engineering.



MarketWatch
Monday, March 5, 2012

Dr. Jen joins ROTH from Maxim Group where he was a senior equity research analyst focusing on the biotechnology sector since 2007. Prior to Maxim Group, he held associate analyst positions with Rodman & Renshaw and Thomas Weisel Partners. His investment views have been cited in The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, Thomson Reuters and Dow Jones Newswires. Prior to joining Wall Street, Yale spent several years with KPMG Corporate Finance Life Sciences Group and Genesis Group Associates focusing on mergers and acquisitions and pipeline optimization for pharmaceutical and biotechnology clients. Dr. Jen holds a Ph.D. in molecular biology from Cornell Medical School and an MBA from Rutgers University.



Medrel
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, February 29, 2012

The Rutgers Institute for Ethical Leadership will host its Third Annual Ethical Leadership Conference on May 3 and 4.

Each year the Institute for Ethical Leadership hosts a conference to address ethical issues within the corporate, nonprofit, and government sectors.

Read the full article



PRLog
Wednesday, February 29, 2012

The Rutgers Institute for Ethical Leadership will host its Third Annual Ethical Leadership Conference on May 3 & 4, 2012.  Each year the Institute for Ethical Leadership hosts a conference to address ethical issues within the corporate, nonprofit, and government sectors.  This year senior leadership from colleges and universities around the country will come together to discuss what it takes to build an organizational culture imbued in ethics and how leaders from across sectors can learn from each other to enhance and renew organizations that benefit civil society.  Ralph Izzo, PhD, Chairman of the Board, President and Chief Executive Officer of PSEG and Chairman of the Rutgers University Board of Governors, will deliver the keynote address on Friday, May 4th.

Read the full article



Entrepreneur
Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Q: It's tax season--time to ponder that annual conundrum: How much of my vehicle usage can I claim as a business expense?

A: The IRS code governing vehicle use runs roughly the length of "Infinite Jest." But it doesn't have to be that complicated, says Jay Soled, a professor of accounting and information systems at Rutgers University, who has testified before Congress on tax compliance issues. "The problem is the rules are a morass," Soled says.

Read the full article

Jay Soled Tax


Monday, February 27, 2012

As for what kind of debt to give as compensation, it can take any number of forms. First, defined-benefit pensions and deferred compensation are already frequently used in practice. These instruments have equal priority with other unsecured creditors in bankruptcy, giving the CEO a strong incentive to look after their interests. And they seem to work: The research of Raghu Sundaram and David Yermack of New York University finds that CEOs with large defined-benefit pensions manage their companies more conservatively. Similarly, a paper by Divya Anantharaman and Vivian Fang of Rutgers University and Guojin Gong of Pennsylvania State University finds that debt compensation leads to fewer loan covenants and a lower cost of debt.



CNN Money
New York, NY
Tuesday, February 21, 2012

The New York Society of Security Analysts (NYSSA), a leading forum for the investment community, and Rutgers Business School will visit the NASDAQ MarketSite in New York City's Times Square. In honor of the occasion, NYSSA Board Secretary, Barry Sine, and John Longo, the Rutgers team advisor, will ring the Closing Bell.



NJ.com
Piscataway, NJ
Thursday, February 16, 2012

Even if most existing science doesn’t find lipstick poses a danger, public discussion of the issue could hurt sales for L’Oreal, said S. Chan Choi, a professor of Supply Chain Management & Marketing Sciences at the Rutgers Business School.

"The main issue here is if you are very loyal to L’Oreal products you can forgive it, but if you are not very loyal and if you are an occasional user of L’Oreal products, then you cannot forgive it," Choi said. "Even if this is safe as the FDA says, they will have to show the consumers they are doing something to remedy whatever this is."



NJ.com
Thursday, February 16, 2012

Even if most existing science doesn’t find lipstick poses a danger, public discussion of the issue could hurt sales for L’Oreal, said S. Chan Choi, a professor of Supply Chain Management & Marketing Sciences at the Rutgers Business School. "The main issue here is if you are very loyal to L’Oreal products you can forgive it, but if you are not very loyal and if you are an occasional user of L’Oreal products, then you cannot forgive it," Choi said. "Even if this is safe as the FDA says, they will have to show the consumers they are doing something to remedy whatever this is."



Dallas, TX
Monday, February 6, 2012

Nancy Brinker, founder and chief executive of Susan G. Komen for the Cure, took home $417,000 in salary in 2010, according to financial documents posted on the charity’s Website, and paid 50 top executives more than $100,000 each.

What the Dallas-based foundation spent on staff and administrative expenses included $20 million for advertising and promotion, $14 million for “office expenses’’ and more than $14 million for consulting and professional services. Another $7 million was spent on contract labor and $3 million for travel. Komen officials did not return calls and emails seeking comment on Monday.

Brinker, who also serves on Komen’s board of directors, traveled first class on airlines with the explicit permission of the board she chairs.

The expenses are disclosed in financial reports on the charity’s website. Komen operations have been under intense scrutiny since last week when a plan to stop giving grants to Planned Parenthood triggered blistering criticism of Komen’s leadership.

James Abruzzo, a management and global business instructor at Rutgers Business School, said the picture that emerges from the Komen documents does raise concerns, however.

The fact that Komen is making severance payments to four top executives is a cause for concern about the way the organization is run, Abruzzo said.

As for Brinker’s salary and first-class travel, while it may be deserved, it probably sends the wrong message to potential donors, he added.

“When you’re trying to raise money from other people, it sends a bad signal," he said.

Read the full article



NJ.com
Warren County, NJ
Sunday, February 5, 2012

Whether they choose to work through B Lab or the state, social entrepreneurs need to establish legitimacy, said Jeffrey Robinson, assistant director of the Rutgers Business School’s Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development. He teaches a social entrepreneurship course and has organized an institute that nurtures burgeoning nonprofit-business hybrids.



Saturday, February 4, 2012

More to the point, will Dodd-Frank prevent another crisis? “The answer is no,” said Ben Sopranzetti, associate professor of finance and economics at Rutgers Business School in Newark and New Brunswick. “However, is this a step in the right direction? Yeah.”



NJ.com
Newark, NJ
Friday, February 3, 2012

With Gov. Chris Christie proposing major changes for University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and new leadership at Rutgers University-Newark, Essex County College and New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark has the historic opportunity to rethink how these institutions of higher education can enhance the quality of life for Newark residents and how the city can make life better for college students.



Bloomberg Radio
Essex County, NJ
Thursday, February 2, 2012



Singapore
Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Professor Farrokh Langdana was recently featured in an Executive Education Guide in Singapore. Please click here to read the article.