Media Coverage

Marketplace
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, December 16, 2014

The Federal Reserve is expected to make some big announcements this week, coming on the heels of meetings in Washington where Janet Yellen and her colleagues will be discussing the health of the U.S. economy. One subject that will undoubtedly come up is plummeting oil prices. As of today, oil is hovering right around $60 a barrel. So how will oil’s new low, low price affect the Fed’s anticipated policy changes?

Let’s start with inflation. One of the Fed’s stated goals is to increase inflation in the U.S. from its current 1.7 percent, to a target rate of 2 percent, “and all that’s going on in the energy sector is somewhat disinflationary if not deflationary,” says Marilyn Cohen, president of Envision capital management. She thinks falling prices in the energy sector could make the Fed cautious about raising interest rates.

But Americans spending less on fuel means consumers have more money for goods and services, “and that,” says former Fed economist Morris Davis, “should create, or at least be correlated, with new job creation.”

Money not being spent on oil would do more good for the economy than the hit that U.S. oil companies will take, and Davis thinks the Fed sees these low oil prices as a new, longer term reality. “If that’s what the Federal Reserve is thinking then they would I guess, assume an extended boom on these low oil prices.”

A continuing boom would be a signal to the Fed that says go ahead, raise interest rates. The Fed will issue its statement on Wednesday.

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Bizwomen
Newark, NJ
Monday, December 15, 2014

When I first called Sharon Lydon to talk about Rutgers Business School's 51 percent female MBA class, she couldn't talk: A new consulting club on campus was having its inaugural meeting and she wanted to be there for it.

We connected later that afternoon, and after 30 minutes on the phone, she (very kindly) told me someone else was vying for her attention: a student, with a new baby in her arms, hanging out by Lydon's office.

"I know she wants to talk to me about working out finals she needs to take," she said.

For Lydon, the associate dean and executive director of the MBA program at Rutgers Business School, these intimate moments built on relationships with students are the norm.

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Bizwomen
New York, NY
Monday, December 15, 2014

Barbara Bates co-founded the boutique communications firm Eastwick in Silicon Valley when many of today's most prominent tech leaders were still in diapers.

And over the past 24 years, the company has become one of the top names in public relations on the West Coast, with a client roster that has included giants, such as Hewlett-Packard, Adobe, Dell and Siemens, as well as startups gunning for an IPO and family-run small businesses.

But the last four years — with Bates as the only founding partner still working with Eastwick — have been all about growth. The company saw nearly 40 percent growth in revenue from 2012 to 2013 with offices in Sunnyvale, Calif., and San Francisco, and is on track to grow another 20 percent from 2013 to 2014, Bates said.

Now her latest venture is opening a third office — in New York City.

The move seemed like a natural progression for the company, considering that Eastwick's East Coast clientele have long hoped the firm would open a new operation in their time zone — and there are hundreds of potential clients in the most populous city in the nation.

But it's also a difficult move: The ecosystems of California's Silicon Valley and New York's "Silicon Alley" are drastically different — not to mention 3,000 miles apart.

"It can be very difficult for an outside firm to break into the (new) network and leverage the resources that are there," said Brett Anita Gilbert, an associate professor of entrepreneurship at Rutgers Business School, who's done extensive research on the idea of geographic clusters for business.

Essentially, Gilbert said, "they have to become an insider."

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New Brunswick, NJ
Thursday, December 11, 2014

In “The Economic Value of a Law Degree,” from The Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 43, No. 2 (June 2014), Michael Simkovic and Frank McIntyre find that law school graduates typically earn $39,000 to 57,000 more per year than similar college graduates. Responding to recent criticism about the return on investment of law degrees, the researchers show that, even for low earners, a law degree more than pays for itself over the course of a lifetime.

Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Department of Education, Simkovic and McIntyre compare lifetime earnings of bachelor’s degree holders to lifetime earnings of law degree holders, including the 40% of law degree holders who do not practice law. Controlling for other factors that relate to earnings like college major, standardized test scores, GPA, family background, and self-reported motivation, the researchers find that law degree holders earn an average of 84% more per month than similar bachelor’s degree holders.

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Amsterdam
Thursday, December 11, 2014

Professor Nancy DiTomaso (Rutgers Business School) will discuss her 2013 book entitled 'The American Non-dilemma: Racial Inequality without Racism' (New York: Russell Sage Foundation). She will focus on her argument that racial inequality gets reproduced in the post-civil rights period as much by the advantages that whites provide to each other as by discrimination and racism of whites toward nonwhites.

DiTomaso argues that the segregation of neighborhoods, schools, and even churches contributes to whites using social networks among themselves to find jobs that are protected from market competition and that the “bias for” other whites contributes to different cognitive, political, and legal outcomes than having to enact “bias against” blacks and other nonwhites.
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Bizwomen
Newark, NJ
Thursday, December 11, 2014

It's been a landmark year for gender parity and diversity at Rutgers Business School.

In January, Dr. Lei Lei will take over as dean of Rutgers Business School in New Jersey and will be the first female to hold the role in a full-time, permanent capacity. And this fall, the school welcomed an incoming full-time MBA class of 80 students that was 51 percent female.

Though the school has long teetered near the 50 percent mark, said Sharon Lydon, executive director of the MBA program, "this is the first time we broke that barrier."

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NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Thursday, December 11, 2014

Sharon Lydon, executive director of the Rutgers Business School, parses no words about the underrepresentation of women in business.

“I would say it’s very strong and evident if you look at the amount of CEOs that hold seats. There are very few women compared to men,” she said.

That’s why she’s so excited about the school’s important milestone regarding gender parity: Next year’s students will be 51 percent female, Lydon said.

This makes Rutgers Business School the first in the nation to have a program in which more than half of its students are female.

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Men’s Health
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Long relegated to the bowels of toilet bowls and septic tanks, poop has gone mainstream, with a slew of websites offering poop on demand. It's not as gross as it sounds—on second thought, it really is—with poop delivery services giving customers a chance to buy the ultimate spite gifts for those who've wronged them.

“This isn't a gag, it's an attack,” claims Ann K. Buchholtz, Ph.D., Professor of Leadership and Ethics at Rutgers Business School. “It's an effort to 'get back' at someone who won't necessarily know who sent it. The reactions of the recipients could be anything from anger to annoyance to fear. Purposefully unsettling another person is not a joke. In fact, studies have shown that people who lash out at others actually do themselves harm physically and psychologically in the process. It prolongs the anger instead of releasing it and it can cause hypertension and depression.”

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Newark, NJ
Tuesday, December 9, 2014

It's been a landmark year for gender parity and diversity at Rutgers Business School.

In January, Dr. Lei Lei will take over as dean of Rutgers Business School in New Jersey and will be the first female to hold the role in a full-time, permanent capacity. And this fall, the school welcomed an incoming full-time MBA class of 80 students that was 51 percent female.

Though the school has long teetered near the 50 percent mark, said Sharon Lydon, executive director of the MBA program, "this is the first time we broke that barrier."

Full Article



Pharmacy Choice
Newark, NJ
Monday, December 8, 2014

Rutgers MBA students Mittal Shah and Sonal Patel were sitting next to one another in Rutgers Business School's Bove Auditorium as the winners of the annual biopharmaceutical case competition were announced on the afternoon of Nov. 14.

Within a few minutes, they knew that Kellogg had won third place. And then, Wharton was announced as the second-place winner.

The women looked at one another, nervously wondering where the team from Rutgers Business School would place. "It's going to be all or nothing," Patel said softly, waiting for the next winner to be announced.

When Rutgers was declared the first place winner, Shah and Patel leaped out of their chairs and hugged one another. The room erupted with applause for the home team, which also included Michael Kwatkoski, Paul Rosiak and Kinushuk Saxena, the team's sole first-year MBA student. All five students are pursuing MBAs in Rutgers Business School's top-ranked Pharmaceutical Management program.

The third annual biopharmaceutical case competition at Rutgers attracted teams from the nation's leading business schools, including Wharton, Columbia and Kellogg. Teams also represented Michigan State University, MIT Sloan, Duke, Penn State's Smeal College of Business and the University of Georgia's Terry College of Business.

After just a few years, Rutgers Business School's case competition has become known as an important one for MBA students hoping to move into careers in the healthcare and pharmaceutical fields. The competition has multiple company sponsors, intensifying the networking aspect of the day and the potential for students to impress major companies.

Full Article



Noodls
Newark, NJ
Monday, December 8, 2014

Rutgers University-Newark has a decades-old tradition of using its academic resources in service to the people of the state, especially in its hometown. This sharing of public scholarship often takes the form of collaborations of RU-N faculty and students with city government or the business community.  However, two current projects -- involving Rutgers Business School (RBS) Professor Kevin Lyons and his students - are aimed at benefitting both the public and the private sectors, as well as Newark's citizens.

Lyons and his Supply Chain Environmental Management classes, both undergraduate and graduate, are working with the City of Newark's various procurement divisions to streamline their purchasing processes and make awarding of contracts more efficient and less time-consuming.  "We're examining purchasing policies at the state and local level, and the layers of bureaucracy, that can stretch out awarding of a contract to take six months," he says. "Outsiders bring a fresh eye and can see things more objectively," he explains.

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NJ.com
Newark, NJ
Monday, December 8, 2014

New Jersey is making an economic recovery. Just ask your neighborhood dry cleaner.

That’s what a team at Rutgers Business School did, using a novel economic index: the Dry Cleaning Index, or DCI.

Farrokh Langdana, a professor of finance and economics at Rutgers Business School, came up with the index of starched shirts, suits and blouses based on a statistic behind unemployment numbers: the people over age 16 who are unemployed but who are not seeking work.

Unemployment numbers are based solely on the number of people seeking work. This means that official unemployment figures can be misleading if big numbers of people are discouraged from continuing to try to find work.

"The index provides information that was not previously available, and it captures, to some extent, the mobility of workers back into the work force to look for work," said Langdana.

“It’s a little outside the box, but from an economic indicator point of view, it provides an interesting perspective in New Jersey,” said Dan Stoll, a Rutgers Business School spokesman.

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Newark, NJ
Monday, December 8, 2014

Rutgers Business School, Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development has the mission to support the revitalization of Newark, New Jersey. Through its academic resources and partnering outreach the Center seeks to build a strong entrepreneurial and small business community in Newark.

On November 18, 2014 the Center presented a special program that included a panel discussion entitled, “Local Wealth, Global Millions” followed by its 1st Annual Entrepreneurship Awards Ceremony honoring entrepreneurs with ties to Rutgers University.  The award ceremony was led by CUEED Executive Director Lyneir Richardson who oversees the implementation of CUEED research and practitioner oriented programs that includes fundraising. Also, participating were Jasmine Cordero, Managing Director of CUEED, and Alfred Blake, Director of Undergraduate Entrepreneurship at Rutgers University.

PNC Bank which has ties to the local community was the inaugurating sponsor for the Awards Ceremony.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Sunday, December 7, 2014

Though the marketing mix traditionally includes four Ps, today's successful strategies must include consideration of people - readers, staff, and advertisers - as well.

I am teaching an introduction to marketing honours class at Rutgers Business School.

On the first day of class I addressed my students as follows:

"You will be tested on the course material in this class not because it represents immutable truths that will last you a lifetime; rather you will be tested to demonstrate your ability to learn and to apply what you learn. The most significant aspect of a college degree is not that you graduate knowing everything you need to know, but that you are ready for the continual learning curve that will be your career.

"Employment is just another form of graduate school, albeit a preferable one. In college, you pay tuition for the privilege of learning. When you are employed, someone will pay you to learn, apply what you learn, and then continue to learn and grow.

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circuitnet.com
New York, NY
Friday, December 5, 2014

ACM (the Association for Computing Machinery) www.acm.org has designated 49 scientists, engineers and educators as Distinguished Members for their individual contributions, and their singular impacts on the vital field of computing. Their achievements have had a significant influence on the social, economic and cultural areas of daily lives all over the world. The 2014 Distinguished Members are from universities in Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Netherlands, Sweden, Japan, India, the United Kingdom and North America, and from leading international corporations and research institutions.

ACM President Alexander Wolf hailed these ACM members as "drivers of the advances and inventions that are propelling the information revolution in new directions. Their creativity and commitment to their craft ensures that we will benefit as a society in the digital age.” He added that these innovators “demonstrate the advantages of ACM membership, which empowers and inspires a bold vision for advancing computing and the computing community."

Professor Hui Xiong, Department of Management Science & Information Systems, Rutgers Business School was recognized as a 2014 Distinguished Scientist.

Full Article



Brisbane Times
Friday, December 5, 2014

There’s a curious trend happening in workplaces: they’re becoming depersonalized. It began with hot-desking, then it ramped up with work-from-home options, and now it’s really taken off with virtual teams where people aren’t in the office at all. Is it OK, though, to spend years working for an organization without ever meeting your colleagues?

Some would say yes, definitely. The idea of never seeing your boss or, conversely, avoiding eye contact with your employees, might truly be a godsend. Others, however, lament the loss of human connection and deplore the onset of a new type of workplace isolation.

That isolation is defined by the fundamental way in which work has changed. Once upon a time, work was a destination to which people commuted. But now, for many employees, work is simply a task or a role they complete. Where they do it is mostly irrelevant.

Either way, the challenge for managers and business owners will be to lead a team with sufficient amounts of cohesion and collaboration in the absence of real-world physical contact.

Earlier this year, Terri Kurtzberg from Rutgers Business School released her new book, Virtual Teams, in which she linked the rise of remote work to job dissatisfaction.

Her argument is that, in the past, employees could tolerate a crappy job if they worked with awesome colleagues. Any displeasure they felt about their work was compensated by the respect and friendship they derived from workplace relationships.

Virtual workers don’t have that luxury. If they’re doing a job they dislike, they’re stuck in the misery of it because they can’t turn to a workmate and vent. That’s why Associate Professor Kurtzberg recommends leaders should “take a hands-on role in making sure that connections remain vibrant.” Employees, too, should be “supporting each other to promote the wellbeing of the group.”

Full Article



WBGO
Newark, NJ
Monday, December 1, 2014

Cyber Monday got its start at a time when many people could only get a high-speed Internet connection at work to shop online deals. But that’s not the case anymore, and it’s impacting how we shop for the holidays.

Shoppers both in stores and online got an early jump on this year’s holiday discounts, which could lead to less of an incentive to shop on the internet this Cyber Monday.

But Rutgers Business School Professor Marc Kalan says that’s because online shopping is now more spread out over the holiday season.

“Instead of calling it Cyber Monday, pretty soon we’re going to just start calling it Cyber 24/7, the place where you can go at any point in time, and of course that’s going to therefore put a little more pressure on the bricks and mortar guys to stay open even longer hours, or offer more opportunities, more unique sales.”

Kalan says every day is Cyber Monday for online shoppers—and that means they’re not as concerned about getting the best deal on any one day leading up to the major holidays.

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Rutgers Today
Newark, NJ
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Rutgers Business School students are helping New Jersey businesses while gaining valuable on-the-job experience. The Student Experiential Learning Program pairs students with small companies where they act as consultants, managing real projects to help their clients thrive.

Watch their work in action. (YouTube)



Newark, NJ
Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Rutgers University MBA students Mittal Shah and Sonal Patel were sitting next to one another in Rutgers Business School’s Bove Auditorium as the winners of the annual biopharmaceutical case competition were announced.

Within a few minutes, they knew that Kellogg had won third place. And then, Wharton was announced as the second-place winner.

The women looked at one another, nervously wondering where the team from Rutgers Business School would place. “It’s going to be all or nothing,” Patel said softly, waiting for the next winner to be announced.

When Rutgers was declared the first place winner, Shah and Patel leaped out of their chairs and hugged one another. The room erupted with applause for the home team, which also included Michael Kwatkoski, Paul Rosiak and Kinushuk Saxena, the team’s sole first-year MBA student. All five students are pursuing MBAs in Rutgers Business School’s top-ranked Pharmaceutical Management program.

The third annual biopharmaceutical case competition at Rutgers attracted teams from the nation’s leading business schools, including Wharton, Columbia and Kellogg. Teams also represented Michigan State University, MIT Sloan, Duke, Penn State’s Smeal College of Business and the University of Georgia’s Terry College of Business.

After just a few years, Rutgers Business School’s case competition has become known as an important one for MBA students hoping to move into careers in the healthcare and pharmaceutical fields. The competition has multiple company sponsors, intensifying the networking aspect of the day and the potential for students to impress major companies.

Professor Mahmud Hassan, director of the Lerner Center for Pharmaceutical Management, said Rutgers is trying to model its case competition after the well-respected one hosted by Kellogg School of Business.

Hassan said next year he hopes to increase the number of teams that participate and to attract international schools to the event. Rutgers has the potential to do that because of the consortium of company sponsors, he said.

“Having more companies makes it more attractive to the teams,” he said. “The students get to network with more companies, and the companies get to see the talent of the students.” This year, the sponsoring companies were Bayer, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Campbell Alliance, Eisai, Herspiegel Consulting, Novartis and Novo Nordisk.

“For both sides, it’s a win,” Hassan said.

Full Article



Newark, NJ
Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Sing Tao Daily reported that Rutgers University today announced the appointment of an ethnic Chinese woman Professor Lei Lei as the Dean of Rutgers Business School, beginning on January 1 next year; she took office for a term of three years.

The appointment was announced by the Newark campus of Rutgers University Chancellor Nancy Cantor, New Brunswick Chancellor Richard Edwards, and Provost Todd Clear. In a joint statement the three university leaders praised Lei Lei is an excellent researcher and educator, and she also led the school in more than one outstanding business school research projects.

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Daily Targum
Livingston Campus, Piscataway NJ
Monday, November 24, 2014

Rutgers Business School students found a place on the basketball court when they got the opportunity to observe women’s basketball coach C. Vivian Stringer train her team this past October.

A course called “Management Skills” made its debut at the Rutgers Business School in the fall of 2013, said Phyllis Siegel, an associate professor in the Department of Management and Global Business, which developed this event. The course is required for all first-year business school undergraduate students.

The learning objectives of the course include the ability to better understand and work more effectively with others. The department wanted students to have an opportunity to meet and observe a “real” team that echoes concepts and utilizes skills taught in class.

“The course focuses on specific concepts and critical skills that individuals need to know and have in order to work more effectively with others in organizations, work well in teams and lead teams and organizations successfully,” Siegel said.

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badcredit.org
Newark, NJ
Monday, November 24, 2014

A pair of real estate economists claim they’ve found a new quirk in the post-recession housing market — not knowing the price of their homes may have kept many homeowners from defaulting on their mortgages.

Rutgers Business School Professor Morris A. Davis and University of Wisconsin-Madison Associate Professor Erwan Quintin revealed their findings in their latest paper “Default When Current House Prices are Uncertain.”

One of the biggest issues here, Davis and Quintin point out, is “anyone that owns a house knows they cannot state the current sales price with certainty.” For this reason, Davis likened homes as an investment similar to both automobiles and art.

“The physical structure of the home is reproducible and should be easily valued based on replacement cost, like a car,” Davis said. “And the land the home sits on is not reproducible and therefore harder to value (although there may be close substitutes), like art. Real estate prices sometimes look like car prices and sometimes look like art prices for this reason.”

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Newark, NJ
Monday, November 24, 2014

On any Sunday morning, cars fill the parking lots of Central Jersey shopping centers.

Shopping: It's just what we do. And in the coming days, we'll be shifting into high gear.

"It is the state sport," said Marc Kalan, a faculty member of the Rutgers Business School, teaching in New Brunswick and Newark. "New Jersey has the widest array of shopping possible, from your most basic dollar store to small downtown shop owners to big-box retailers to the most exclusive retailers in the country. The Short Hills Mall is like Madison Avenue under glass."

It's also about the audience, Kalan added. "New Jerseyans have a high average income and the heaviest concentration of people in the country without having a huge city. This megalopolis makes it a very exciting place for retailers, big and small, to locate."

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All Analytics
Newark, NJ
Friday, November 21, 2014

It's interesting how one story can lead to another. I was researching an article here about Michael Koukounas's book, Real-World Analytics, and during an interview with Koukounas, he happened to mention the exciting stuff happening at his alma mater, New Jersey's Rutgers Business School. In particular, the Master's in quantitative finance (MQF) program.

The interesting aspect of his recommendation, it turns out, was not that it's a new program. It's been around for more than a decade; he was pointing to it because of increased relevance for employers. That's somewhat interesting. But another eye-opening aspect, it turns out, is that here was a Rutgers MBA promoting a master's degree that wasn't an MBA.

It turns out that the MQF is creating talent where MBAs are often inadequate.

As Professor Yangru Wu, the MQF program director, explained to me, MBA programs generally do not produce enough candidates with the combination of skills needed for employers' analytical positions.

Why not design an entire academic program around the quant, computer programming, and finance proficiencies required?

That's exactly what Rutgers did in 2001 with MQF, starting with seven students, back when it was one of the first such programs in the world. Now, 110 students are enrolled in the two year program (out of roughly 1,000 students who would have applied over that time). The MQF has grown in stature, too, becoming a top-10 national program, with peers and hope-to-be-peers being University of California at Berkeley, Carnegie Mellon, NYU, Columbia, Cornell, Georgia Tech, University of Michigan, and Fordham.

"These are the kinds of programs that we are comparing and competing with to a certain degree," Wu said. In total now, Wu estimated that 100 similar programs exist.

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Mondaq
Newark, NJ
Friday, November 21, 2014

The recent increase in hedge fund activism is "hyperbolic" and should be carefully assessed, according to two notable scholars, John C. Coffee Jr. (corporate law; Columbia) and Darius Palia (corporate finance; Rutgers Business School), who have just published on comprehensive study on hedge fund activism entitled, "The Impact of Hedge Fund Activism: Evidence and Implications." The authors address various perspectives on the benefits and repercussions of hedge fund-led corporate change, relying on statistical analysis and market data to answer four questions:

  • Who are the targets of activism?
  • Does hedge fund activism create real value?
  • What are the sources of gains from activism?
  • Do the targets of activism experience post-intervention changes in real variables?

Full Article

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BusinessBecause
New Brunswick, NJ
Wednesday, November 19, 2014

On weekday mornings, Daria Demina rises at 5AM in Moscow with a thirst for knowledge. The financial bachelor’s student, enrolled at the Plekhanov Russian University of Economics, is at her peak of activity from 6AM. The only problem is that her classmates and lecturers are all still fast asleep. “I… Have a weird regime,” says Daria.

The ambitious Russian financier won’t wait for them to wake. Like a growing number of MBA candidates, she plugs into cyberspace to supplement her learning in-between degree studies. “I learn fast, and when things are too slow at lectures at university I get frustrated,” Daria says.

Students like Daria, who have grown up swiping, texting and blogging, are increasingly demanding flexibility in their study.

“In the recent trends we have seen, managerial professionals do not have the bandwidth to dedicate two to five years of their time to an MBA,” says Peter Methot, who leads executive education at Rutgers Business School in the US. Like a handful of others, Rutgers runs a “mini-MBA” that is taught entirely online.

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NJBIZ
Newark, NJ
Tuesday, November 18, 2014

The Rutgers Business School's Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development announced Tuesday its inaugural Entrepreneurship Awards.

The awards, according to a news release, will be given as part of an event CUEED is hosting for Global Entrepreneurship Week.

Mukesh M. Patel, founder of Somerset-based JuiceTank, is being recognized as one of the Rutgers Alumni Entrepreneurs at the event.

CUEED Executive Director Lyneir Richardson said the aim of the awards is to create awareness of forward-thinking business people and the role they play in growing the economy.

“This new award initiative at Rutgers Business School is dedicated to recognizing innovative entrepreneurs who are having an impact on their respective industry, the community and employees,” Richardson said in a statement. “These awards celebrate those inventors, disruptors, luminaries and newsmakers that have an impact on urban environments, regional business communities and even the global economy.”

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Financial Post
Newark, NJ
Sunday, November 16, 2014

Once reviled as a threat to the status quo in executive suites and clubby corporate boardrooms, activist hedge funds are today lauded as catalysts for change, gaining clout and board seats in blue-chip companies: Canadian Pacific Railway, Microsoft Corp. and Procter & Gamble Co.

Like the leveraged-buyout kings of the 1980s and 1990s immortalized as “Barbarians at the Gate,” hedge-fund activists are the new breed of corporate crusaders shaking up lethargic companies, and overhauling the way businesses operate in the name of unlocking value for shareholders. The trouble is, their results don’t quite live up to the celebrity.

There are currently more than 400 activist hedge funds flexing their muscle worldwide: during the first six months of 2014, 148 activist campaigns were launched in the U.S. — up from 52 in 2005-2006. “Whatever their size, few companies today seem immune from the reach of hedge-fund activism,” concluded the report by Prof. Coffee and Darius Palia, a law professor at Rutgers Business School.

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BusinessBecause
New Brunswick, NJ
Sunday, November 16, 2014

America and Canada have become clusters for new “mini-MBA” courses which are being taught from Toronto to New Brunswick, but the trend has not yet emerged across Europe.

“It acts as a complement,” says Peter Methot, managing director of executive education at Rutgers Business School, which runs up to 18 “mini MBAs” on topics such as entrepreneurship and digital marketing.

“The mini-MBA also serves the purpose of focusing on a specific subject matter in a condensed period of time,” he adds.

Where MBA degrees are expensive, mini courses cost as little as $5,000 and have relaxed entry requirements.

They are targeting middle-managers, according to Alan Middleton, executive director of the Schulich School of Business’ Executive Education Centre. “The mini-MBA tends to get people later on in their careers,” he says, who want to move into broader responsibilities or more senior roles. “They don’t really have time to go back [to business school] for a year or an 18 month program,” Alan adds.

In that sense they are similar to custom executive education courses and EMBAs, which attract candidates who want to move up the ladder in their current careers, rather than establish new ones – although this is starting to change.

Peter says: “We have seen an exponential increase in the value employers place on a mini-MBA.”

Full Article



NVTC
Amsterdam
Tuesday, November 11, 2014

The role of fundraising for the board of trustees of arts organizations.

On November 11, 2014 the NVTC held an exclusive event, sponsored by Camunico and DHR International, where James Abruzzo, co-founder of the Institute for Ethical Leadership at Rutgers Business School shared his expertise concerning the role of fundraising for the board of trustees of arts organizations.

DHR International has developed a prominent position among the cultural sector in the US under the leadership of Mr. James Abruzzo. Mr. Abruzzo has also consulted with cultural organizations in the UK, Germany and Italy as they confront challenges similar to those in The Netherlands.  In that role, he has recruited fund raising professionals to European arts organizations.

In 2013 Mr. Abruzzo, who leads DHR’s global relationships with arts clients, shared his experiences about cultural entrepreneurship in the US. This year Mr. Abruzzo shared his knowledge and experiences about the role of trustees in fundraising for the arts in the US. During this event we continued the dialogue on private fundraising and provided insights into how trustees of Dutch arts organizations may play a successful role.

Read more about the Expertmeeting: Report International Expertmeeting_The role of fundraising for the board of trustees (PDF available)